AI

NEC announced that it will provide a facial recognition system to identify more than 300,000 people during the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games / Photo by 123rf.com

 

Japanese information technology company NEC recently announced that it will be providing a large-scale facial recognition system to identify more than 300,000 people during the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. The system is built around an AI engine called NeoFace.

In a report published by the Verge, the facial-recognition system can identify the people attending the games, including athletes, members of the media, volunteers, and staff. NEC and the organizers of the Tokyo Olympics recognized that the multi-sport event will present security challenges and needs speedy identification of people. The daily added that the challenges arise from the fact that the various sporting events will be spread out in different metropolitan areas and that people will have to authenticate themselves at every venue.

NeoFace is a part of NEC’s Bio-Idiom line of biometric authentication technology that uses voice, fingerprint, and face among others to identify a person.

Together with the organizers of the event, NEC’s goal is to speed up the process via facial recognition. The company has already demonstrated how the technology functions, showing staff and athletes how people cannot enter a venue if they are holding someone else’s identification card. The cards will contain IC chips that will aid the system to automatically verify the identity of the person entering the venue.

The implementation of the security system requires linking the photo data of the owner to the IC card that will be given to accredited people.

To demonstrate that the AI-powered system can function for people of different heights, NEC invited a six-foot-eight former volleyball Olympic athlete to go through the security system. The facial recognition technology worked smoothly, and various people were able to move through the area quickly.

It is hoped that the new security system will prevent the long wait times and keep people away from the oppressive summer heat that authorities are anticipating when the Olympics opens.