IOT

Amazon is one of the most diverse and largest tech companies ever, with their push to the home security this year.  / Photo by: Robert Scoble via Flickr

 

Amazon has dabbled in many things in the past couple of years, whether it be going into streaming services, or making deals with shopping centers all over the US to give people a more comfortable and safer experience in everything they do. This one is just another reason why Amazon is one of the most diverse and largest tech companies ever, with their push to the home security this year. They have already started that by buying Ring, a smart doorbell company, and through the launch of their many different home security packages.

According to a report by Engadget, they have recently went even further during the Alexa event by showing that any Alexa device can be converted into an effective new security feature for your home.

This new feature of Alexa is called “guard mode,”  and can be activated the moment you tell Alexa that you’ve already left your home. The Echo (or any other Alexa enabled device) is now active and sensitive to all forms of sound in the general vicinity, like the sound of glass breaking, or detecting the sound of the smoke alarm or the CO2 detector. Using that information, it would then record what it had head and send it immediately to your smartphone via WiFi so that you are aware of what is happening in your house.

In addition to this, this device would also be compatible with specified professional security companies like Ring and ADT, giving the users the ability to choose which alert is to be pushed and which security company you want to handle your problems. This is by no means a perfect solution to a break-in or robbery, but this new feature could be an additional form of security for any household without the need of installing new hardware around your house.

There is no news yet on when this particular software update is set to come out, but knowing how Amazon works, we could guess that it will come within the next few months.