Observer, Official Sponsor at Nobel Peace Prize Forum

Technology

CEO Kim Se-Jin and Bryan Doreian of Observer participated as an official sponsor in the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Forum. / Photo by: Nickolay Stanev via 123rf

 

Observer, South Korea’s first smart weather service provider that collects weather information from blockchain, participated in the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Forum as an official sponsor, upon the invitation of the Norwegian Nobel Foundation. According to Medium, the invitation was sent by the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal Program.

Attending the symposium, which took place at the University of Oslo on December 11, 2018,  were Kim Se-Jin, the chief executive officer (CEO) of Observer, and Bryan Doreian, its overseas CEO. The two executives met with foreign diplomats and representatives from various countries. Both took part in broad discussions on how blockchain weather business could help delay global warming. 

Gracing the event as keynote speaker was former United States Vice President Al Gore, who was the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. Gore was very interested in the Observer’s business model, which he said had a beneficial effect, and asked for a proactive role in the company’s weather monitoring. On the other hand, Kim Se-Jin made a promise that he will support the global climate monitoring program and expressed his desire to help Gore pursue his quest to prevent global warming. 

Observer collates weather data from smartphones, automobiles, and personal weather stations from all over the world. It was recently certified as the official weather station of the Korea Meteorological Administration. 

Previously, there had been efforts to improve weather forecasting data by gathering data from individuals, but this did not succeed because it was difficult to encourage people to participate in the project. In the future, Observer will pay for the data transmission using the OBSR cryptocurrency, which it hopes will lure more participants. For instance, smartphone users will be rewarded with OBSR coins when they measure the barometric pressure of their current location using the built-in barometric pressure sensor of their phones. The OBSR will also have its own ecosystem by selling big weather data to the insurance, transportation and tourism industries. 

In December 2018, Observer will also launch its own mini weather station that can accurately measure meteorological data, including temperature, pressure, humidity, precipitation, and particulate matter. The measured data will be used in improving weather forecasting accuracy by verifying data validity in the blockchain. More OBSR coins can be obtained by contributing weather observation data to the weather station. 

Observer is also planning to launch collaborative ventures with public institutions, local governments, and financial companies for the expansion of private-sector weather observation networks. It also has plans to partner with Third World government agencies, which often have difficulty installing and operating expensive weather observation equipment.