Zuckerberg and Execs of Facebook Leverage Users' Data With Partners: Report

Apps and Software

Facebook is now having a bad time as the data leaks were exposed last year and this year However, as a recent report reveals, there are yet more unsavory details about Facebook’s actual use of their users’ data, and that’s by leveraging them / Photo by: Coolcaesar via Wikimedia Commons

 

Facebook has been in the public eye for the wrong reason for some time now, and the issues mostly surround data leaks, as well as content on the platform. However, as a recent report reveals, there are yet more unsavory details about Facebook’s actual use of their users’ data, and that’s by leveraging them.

According to a report by NBC News, Facebook has reportedly made deals with business partners and promised data on users as leverage. Sometimes, Facebook even uses it as a reward for their favored companies, while in other companies, the social media company would keep a tight hold on the user data and deny access to them.

This was the case after hundreds of documents, emails, webchats, presentations, spreadsheets, and meeting summaries floated and showed how much Zuckerberg and his board management team would regularly discuss the fate of user’s data in the boardroom.

One of the companies that Facebook favors, Amazon, for instance, was given access to user data because the company actively paid for Facebook advertising content and even partnered with its Fire smartphone.

As preemptive damage control, while this was all going on in the background, Facebook would then formulate “a strategy to publicly frame these moves as a way of protecting user privacy.”

The thing is: many companies are in the habit of sharing information with each other; the difference with Facebook’s case is that they have access to a TMI (too much information) sort of data, and since they have apps like Messenger that parades itself as a vessel of private communication, Facebook has access to more sensitive information that other companies simply don’t possess.

Additionally, the documents also show that Zuckerberg would even choose to dole out data to his personal “friends” who also share their data access to Facebook freely. While these were not enough to lay blame on Facebook for breaking the law, several media outlets have also reported the same thing regarding Facebook and their supposed commitment to user privacy, with about 400 to 4,000 pages of documents pointing to the fact that Facebook’s privacy practices may leave much to be desired.