Apprehension for Autopilot Technology Extends to American Consumers

Autopilot

Autopilot technology and self-driving cars may be the future for carmakers dedicated to making the cars that will usher in the future but many American consumers think that the new technology still needs more studying / Photo by: Steve Jurvetson via Wikimedia Commons

 

Autopilot technology and self-driving cars may be the future for carmakers dedicated to making the cars that will usher in the future, but for many American consumers, that fear of this nascent technology is still palpable.

 

As Global Fleet listed, here are just some of the reasons consumers have not taken so easily to the technology just yet. A study by Reuters and Ipsos revealed that half of Americans actually distrust self-driving cars because of the fact that they see these cars as being more dangerous as traditional cars.

 

Specifically, 63% of people said that they were not willing to pay for a car with self-driving features, while 41% said they would pay, but not more than $2,000.

 

Though this is predictably disheartening for carmakers investing in the technology, they are confident that “regulation or higher insurance premiums” put on traditional cars will steer consumers into giving automated cars a chance.

 

It’s still important to note that many of those who said these in the survey have not seen or ridden the cars before, so it will be interesting if they get the chance to. One of the most common fears involving self-driving cars is the fact that computers might malfunction and cause road accidents.

 

While that certainly is something that might happen, data from an NHTSA study shows that most road accidents are actually attributed to human error. This includes road accidents attributed to the human element (94%) and accidents brought about by humans to other self-driving cars.

 

This should not be a defense to rely on self-driving cars fully, though, since being overly reliant to computer technology in automation could result in road accidents too.

 

The push for automation seems to have no end in sight yet, though, and companies are still actively programming cars to be able to withstand and not get distracted by various obstacles in the road that, by all means, still belong there, such as cyclists in places with enough traffic.