Apple Refutes Report That Recent Pullout of Apps Is “Anti-Competitive”

Apps and Software

Apple had removed from its App Store 11 of 17 popular apps that allow users to limit features and kid’s screen time on mobile devices / Photo by: ParampreetChanana via Pixabay

 

According to a report, which was first released by the New York Times last Saturday, Apple had removed from its App Store 11 of 17 popular apps that allow users to limit features and kid’s screen time on mobile devices. A lot of observers quickly branded Apple for being “anti-competitive” as it has a similar software called Screen Time, but the company asserted that the move was because those programs opened up the users’ privacy and security to risks.

As we all know, private information is coming under attack more frequently now, and such was the defense of Apple in a 500-word post that they put on their website following the release of the New York Times report. Bloomberg wrote that Apple insisted that they pulled out those popular apps from their only store on the grounds that they were reliant on a technology called the “Mobile Device Management” or MDM.

Basically, what MDM does is it “gives a third party control and access over a device and its most sensitive information including user location, app use, email accounts, camera permissions, and browsing history.” So, it’s like a feeding frenzy in the worst way, where the predators are potential advertisers or worse, hackers, and the prey is sensitive, personal information.

But the report reached so wide and struck paranoia in many of Apple users that the company’s marketing chief, Phil Schiller, has had to actually send out emails to assure customers over the weekend that the situation is being handled with care.

Apple’s Screen Time, on the other hand, will merely let people “set limits on certain iPhone and iPad functions and keep track of children’s usage.”

Former Apple executive Tony Fadell took to Twitter to clarify that the feature could still be better. For him, Screen Time was a “rush job” and “very non-intuitive” and reiterated that developers should make sure to go over details in the development process so that they will be able to see right away that the features “don’t violate policies.”