Overcast Innovates App for Easier Podcast Clip-Sharing

Apps and Software

Popular iOS podcast app Overcast developed its system to make it easier for users to share clips of their favorite shows across various social media platforms / Photo by: Kārlis Dambrāns via Flickr

 

Popular iOS podcast app Overcast developed its system to make it easier for users to share clips of their favorite shows across various social media platforms, the company said in an announcement.

According to Overcast, podcasters will likely show a warm welcome to the new feature, especially those who seek to expand their show's audience reach. This is because podcasters have previously been restricted, for the most part, to sharing their shows through links or audio-only snippets, TechCrunch explains.

The tech news site adds that the podcast company's solution for this restriction is to allow anyone—audience and podcasters alike—to share either an audio or video clip from any public podcast. This would give listeners a hand in the action by giving their favorite shows a possible viral boost when they promote it on social media—a variety of platforms that could help podcasts gain new listeners.

Overcast designed its variety of video formats to appeal to people in charge of promoting a podcast via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, or other social media platforms where the supported video's aspect ratios may vary. Podcast marketers can also remove the app's branding from the shared clip so that it will have that professional feel.

“It’s important for me to promote other apps like this, and to make it easy even for other people’s customers to benefit from Overcast’s sharing features because there are much bigger threats than letting other open-ecosystem podcast apps get a few more users,” said Overcast founder Marco Arment, as quoted by TechCrunch.

The bigger threats Arment remarked on refer to the rising trend of podcast "exclusives", like those found on Luminary and Spotify, that are not available to for public listening. Although it can be argued that these aren't podcasts—in the strictest sense of the word—but are audio programs instead, the tech news site says.