Samsung Develops Exynos i T100 For Improved IoT Devices’ Security

IOT

Samsung will be the next tech giant joining the ranks of other technological tycoons looking to improve upon the world of the internet of things (IoT) / Photo by: Oskar Alexanderson via Wikimedia Commons

 

Samsung will be the next tech giant joining the ranks of other technological tycoons looking to improve upon the world of the internet of things (IoT), introducing their new Exynos i T100 in an attempt to provide better security for devices and make them more reliable to short-range communications.

 

According to a report by AP news, this is not the first time that Samsung is dipping its toes into developing tech that could stand side by side with the IoT advances of other tech companies. Already, they have introduced the 1 T200, which works for more long-range, narrow-band communications. The T100, in comparison, will make sure that the T200 technology can also be downsized to work for short range.

 

Ultimately, it is a good decision, in large part because it means Samsung is not afraid of expanding their horizon, and they actually seem to have the willpower to try again and again until they get it right.

 

AP news reports also that this new tech will be equipped with “a power-efficient 28-nanometer (nm) process technology” and will mostly be relegated to doing tasks in homes or businesses, mainly given the commands to “automate and control environments” within the mentioned places.

 

Ben Hur, who is a senior vice president of System LSI marketing at Samsung Electronics, said that the effort of the company to introduce short-range IoT systems that would connect various home products and those in buildings is bolstered by the goal to “make our lives easier and safer.”

 

According to him, the expansion of their IoT technology is equipped with “strong security capabilities” precisely so it can “help further extend IoT services in areas where they could benefit our everyday lives.”

 

And what about hacking? Samsung has also understandably prepared for that, installing a “separate Security Sub-System (SSS) hardware block for data encryption and a Physical Unclonable Function (PUF) that creates a unique identity for each chipset.”