Apps for the Visually Impaired Are Making a Big Difference

Apps and Software

Thanks to apps like the Microsoft Seeing AI, technology can now be extended for the use of the visually impaired / Photo by: Diego Vito Cervo via 123RF

 

Thanks to apps like the Microsoft Seeing AI, technology can now be extended for the use of the visually impaired.

Nutsiri Kidkul says that new technology is very helpful for her condition, especially since being visually impaired means that she needs to plan about the basic things that other people would normally just do. For example, as she tells CNET, having Microsoft Seeing AI helps her a little bit every step of the way.

The technology allows her to gain access to a talking camera, which will be able to “help her read her own mail and documents.”

This is helpful for Kidkul, who ordinarily just have members of her family read her email for her. The technology has so far allowed her to exercise more autonomy for herself and have a little more privacy for her emails.

"It gives me a sense of privacy to be able to sort and read my own mail without assistance from friends or family," Kidkul says.

From this, Kidkul realized that there is still a future in tech, no matter her disability, and has thus managed to work her way to the top after she had been a student at the Braille Institute in Los Angeles. She was a student there first but now is the lead tech instructor in the institute for four years.

Other than the Microsoft Seeing AI, Kidkul also mentions that technology is beginning to diversify its audiences little by little. There are still business mutual benefits to this, as companies will have access to more users and the communities won’t feel as left out.

As Kidkul says, there are also other apps that are eager to help make the world a safer, more convenient place for other visually impaired people. Apps like InstaCart “simplifies grocery shopping” while Money Reader can help aid visually impaired people with identifying money without assistance from other people.