New iOS App Keeps Your Contact Photos Updated

Apps and Software

A new iOS-exclusive application helps users keep their contact photos up to date, relieving them from the displeasing sight of gray initial boxes in their Apple's Phone app, iMessage, and other messaging platforms / Photo by: HeikoAL via Pixabay

 

A new iOS-exclusive application helps users keep their contact photos up to date, relieving them from the displeasing sight of gray initial boxes in their Apple's Phone app, iMessage, and other messaging platforms.

While its a minor issue, TechCrunch said that it could still have an effect on people with wide networks; those who typically interact with a number of clients or customers due to the nature of their job or far-flung workers who wish to remember what their remote colleagues look like.

The new iOS contacts utility, Vignette, solves this grievance. Once activated, the app will scan selected fields in the user's contacts such as their Email (used for Gravatar), Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram (which is, unfortunately, not one of the default options in iOS Contacts).

Users will then be able to update the selected contacts with the photo the app finds, TechCrunch reported. It added that users will also be able to choose the photo they prefer if there are multiple results. Moreover, Vignette allows simultaneous updating of multiple contacts with the "Select All" feature.

Updates used with the utility app warrant a one-time payment of $4.99, but users will only be charged with the said amount if they decide to push through with updating their contact photos. If they feel that the app wouldn't find anything, users can choose to run a scan first before proceeding to the payment.

Other third-party utilities for contact management, including those that install updates based on a user's data on their social network profile, usually require users to authenticate with the third-party network so that the additional consent could be retrieved.

That is not the case for Vignette, the tech news site said.

"The app instead takes a privacy-minded approach to its work. It doesn’t require you upload your contacts to its servers, and it only uses the social networks anonymously as opposed to having you log in," TechCrunch explained.